"This is the finest blog I have seen for the kitchen industry. The designs unveiled on this site are so insanely new and innovative, you'll find them here before any publication can muster pen to paper. This is a site from a blogger with a true kitchen design obsession that will have you reading every column inch with pleasure and delight."

Jackie Daly, Managing Editor, KBB Magazine



Tuesday, 30 October 2012

Tearing down the walls!

Walls can leave an abrupt and permanent impact upon a living space, the type of restrictive influence that can be expensive to reverse and can deliver an un-compromising legacy for future design!
By creating separation between architecture and kitchen new possibilities begin to emerge!  The kitchen can be used as an approachable, multi functional buffer, providing spatial definition in an open plan setting that maximises storage and leaves sightlines free from obvious obstruction.
To embrace change is to consider new possibilities – so imagine the missed opportunity here if this kitchen had been placed against a wall!
The modern kitchen can now be defined as an island and this design showcases its potential!

Wednesday, 17 October 2012

Counterweighted Equilibrium

This design teeters on a counterweighted equilibrium causing the viewer to question if this is kitchen or art! 
Functional performance is enhanced through levitation with storage being restricted to an ergonomically efficient hot zone.  Variance of height and depth are used to provide aesthetic interest and contrasting colours and patterns provide an avenue for artistic flair.
A text book example of contemporary kitchen design by Valcucine!  Love it!

Monday, 8 October 2012

Architectural Incarcerator




Kitchen design is a play with shapes; a medium for delivering functionality while satisfying artistic curiosity. 
This design has defied its architectural incarcerator, delivering a standalone design presence amid restrictive surroundings.  By manipulating only one of the 3 dimensional planes this design stands out from the crowd.  In this instance variable height is used to create interest and increase functional performance.
The island is elevated allowing the floor to become un-masked; the removal of low level cabinetry also allows items to be stored within an ergonomically efficient hot zone.
The elevated, table area allows this design to morph between states of use providing the user with the flexibility of casual dining and the aesthetic interest of a transforming shelf.  Consider how the feature looks when the table is retracted and not in use!  The cantilevered shelf hovers, causing shadows to manipulate the white surfaces and the layering effect is amplified through the cantilevers new found proximity to the contrasting work surface.  This is beautiful!
The Mogul is unsure about the long, wall mounted shelf though!  Is it needed?  Is it too high?  And could you bump your head?

Tuesday, 2 October 2012

Simply Complex


Even the simplicity of contemporary design can benefit from aesthetic layering.  Layers can provide definition and interest to a design and help the viewer appreciate how simplicity can be derived from complex thought!
Here we see how a simple step in the work surface and deliver multiple contrasts of material, texture, colour and form.  Offsetting the feature creates definition along three planes and introduces some asymmetrical styling to the design.  The elevated placement of the cleaning zone may also deliver enhanced ergonomic performance.
This idea is simple but effective and The Mogul loves it!

Monday, 1 October 2012

Anthropometric Miscalculation



The aesthetic simplicity of this design helps to camouflage an impatient yearning to be noticed. 
The black, super sheen doors absorb their surroundings by reflection and blur the boundaries between kitchen and architecture.  Only the kitchen worktop provides definition presenting an angular anomaly that defies convection and provokes a slight tilting of the head!
This angular feature is thrust to the fore with the help of a basic monochrome colour scheme but it is the same choices of colour and finish that help to conceal an anthropometric miscalculation!
A slight gradient allows the base unit doors to lean against the wall.  It could be argued that having the units deeper at the bottom adds aesthetic interest and allows artistic flair to be satisfied but it may eventually be a pain, increasing functional reach distances and causing stresses on the lower back!